Ten Books I’m Looking Forward to in October

After the traditional summer slow-down in publishing, the fall releases are coming fast and furious. Here are 10 books from my TBR I’m particularly looking forward to next month.

Neil Gaiman’s Likely Stories by Neil Gaiman and Mark Buckingham (October 2)

These dark and imaginative tales feature an odd and subtly linked world of bizarre venereal diseases, a creepy old woman who feasts on raw meat, a man obsessed with a skin model from a magazine, and a story within a story about ghosts.

 

The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy (Montague Siblings, #2) by Mackenzi Lee (October 2)

A year after an accidentally whirlwind tour of Europe, which she spent evading highwaymen and pirates with her brother Monty, Felicity has returned to England with two goals in mind—avoid the marriage proposal of Callum Doyle, a lovestruck suitor from Edinburgh; and enroll in medical school. However, her intellect and passion will never be enough in the eyes of the administrators, who see men as the sole guardians of science.

 

The Ravenmaster: My Life with the Ravens at the Tower of London by Christopher Skaife (October 2)

A rewarding, intimate, and inspiring partnership has developed between the ravens and their charismatic and charming human, the Ravenmaster, who shares the folklore, history, and superstitions surrounding the ravens and the Tower. Shining a light on the behavior of the birds, their pecking order and social structure, and the tricks they play on us, Skaife shows who the Tower’s true guardians really are―and the result is a compelling and irreverent narrative that will surprise and enchant.

 

The Hollow of Fear (Lady Sherlock, #3) by Sherry Thomas (October 2)

Under the cover of “Sherlock Holmes, consulting detective,” Charlotte Holmes puts her extraordinary powers of deduction to good use. Aided by the capable Mrs. Watson, Charlotte draws those in need to her and makes it her business to know what other people don’t.

 

Mycroft and Sherlock by Kareem Abdul Jabbar and Anna Waterhouse (October 9)

Now a force to be reckoned with in the War Office, the young Mycroft Holmes is growing his network of contacts and influence, although not always in a manner that pleases his closest friend, Cyrus Douglas.

 

A Crafter Knits a Clue (A Handcrafted Mystery, #1) by Holly Quinn (October 9)

When a heartbroken Samantha “Sammy” Kane returns to her hometown of Heartsford, WI, for her best friend Kate’s funeral, she learns that Kate’s much-loved craft store is in danger of perishing with its owner. Confounding all her expectations of the life she would live, Sammy moves back home with her golden retriever and takes over Community Craft. A few doors down Main Street, fellow new arrival Ingrid Wilson has just opened the Yarn Barn, a real “purl” of a shop. But when Sammy strolls over to see if Ingrid could use a little help, she finds Ingrid’s dead body—with a green aluminum knitting needle lodged in her throat.

 

A Little Tea Book: All the Essentials from Leaf to Cup by Sebastian Beckwith and Caroline Paul (October 16)

Tea, the most popular beverage in the world after water, has brought nations to war, defined cultures, bankrupted coffers, and toppled kings. And yet in many ways this fragrantly comforting and storied brew remains elusive, even to its devotees. As down-to-earth yet stylishly refined as the drink itself, A Little Tea Book submerges readers into tea, exploring its varieties, subtleties, and pleasures right down to the process of selecting and brewing the perfect cup.

 

The Library Book by Susan Orlean (October 16)

On the morning of April 29, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. As the moments passed, the patrons and staff who had been cleared out of the building realized this was not the usual false alarm. As one fireman recounted later, “Once that first stack got going, it was Goodbye, Charlie.” The fire was disastrous: It reached 2,000 degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed 400,000 books and damaged 700,000 more. Investigators descended on the scene, but over thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who?

 

The Bullet Journal Method by Ryder Carroll (October 23)

Like many of us, Ryder Carroll tried everything to get organised — countless apps, systems, planners, you name it. Nothing really worked. Then he invented his own simple system that required only pen and paper, which he found both effective and calming. He shared his method with a few friends, and before long he had a worldwide viral movement.

 

The White Darkness by David Grann (October 30)

Henry Worsley was a devoted husband and father and a decorated British special forces officer who believed in honor and sacrifice. He was also a man obsessed. He spent his life idolizing Ernest Shackleton, the nineteenth-century polar explorer, who tried to become the first person to reach the South Pole, and later sought to cross Antarctica on foot. Shackleton never completed his journeys, but he repeatedly rescued his men from certain death, and emerged as one of the greatest leaders in history.

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Ten Books I’m Looking Forward to in June

Ten of the books on my TBR coming out in June (I seem to have skipped May. This month has been weird, y’all.) that I’m especially looking forward to:

President Bill Clinton and bestselling novelist James Patterson have written a spellbinding thriller, The President is Missing.

The President Is Missing
Bill Clinton and James Patterson
(June 4)

Do I really need to know more than that? No, not really.

 

Let the Whole Thundering World Come Home begins at the grave of Katagiri Roshi, Natalie’s Zen teacher, in Japan. Twenty years after Katagiri’s death and Natalie’s return to New Mexico, she is permanently settled in Santa Fe with her partner, Yukwan. Except that, as Buddhism teaches us, nothing is permanent.

Let the Whole Thundering World Come Home: A Memoir
Natalie Goldberg
(June 5)

Natalie Goldberg is one of my favorite writers-on-writing.

 

In 1587, 115 men, women, and children arrived on Roanoke, an island off the coast of North Carolina. Chartered by Queen Elizabeth I, their colony was to establish a foothold for England in the New World. But by the time the colony’s leader, John White, returned to Roanoke from a resupply mission in England, his settlers were nowhere to be found. They had vanished into the wilderness, leaving behind only a single clue–the word “Croatoan” carved into a tree.

The Secret Token: Myth, Obsession, and the Search for the Lost Colony of Roanoke
Andrew Lawler
(June 5)

At first glance, I thought this was going to be a novel about Roanoke. But it is not. It is a non-fiction look at what might have happened, how archaeologists are trying to figure it out, and the way the Lost Colony has entered the popular consciousness.

 

Nora Tucker is looking forward to summer vacation in Wolf Creek–two months of swimming, popsicles, and brushing up on her journalism skills for the school paper. But when two inmates break out of the town’s maximum security prison, everything changes.

Breakout
by Kate Messner
(June 5)

I’m always up for a new Kate Messner book.

 

Tea and books: the perfect pairing. There’s nothing quite like sitting down to a good book on a lovely afternoon with a steaming cup of tea beside you, as you fall down the rabbit hole into the imaginative worlds of Alice in Wonderland, The Hobbit, and Sherlock Holmes . . .

A Literary Afternoon Tea: 55 Recipes for Savory Nibbles, Bite-Sized Sweets, and Custom Teas for Book Lovers
Alison Walsh
(June 5)

I prefer the title on the cover image, so I hope that’s the one they’re going with. I’m not sure “want to read” is quite right, since it’s a cookbook. But I’m definitely looking forward to paging through this one. Books! Tea!

 

When Katie Met Cassidy is a romantic comedy that explores how, as a culture, while we may have come a long way in terms of gender equality, a woman’s capacity for an entitlement to sexual pleasure still remain entirely taboo. This novel tackles the question: Why, when it comes to female sexuality, are so few women figuring out what they want and then going out and doing it?

When Katie Met Cassidy
Camille Perri
(June 19)

That actually sounds rather serious, but I’ve seen this book characterized as “a rom-com with two women”, which I am totally here for.

 

[…]But a few days later Kate receives a call from the police–Cordelia has been found dead on the mansion property, and Kate is all-but certain that her name is high on the suspect list. She finds herself juggling the murder investigation and her growing fascination with the magnificent old house that turns out to be full of long-hidden mysteries itself. Kate knows she must clear her name and save her town–before she ends up behind bars.

Murder at the Mansion (Victorian Village Mysteries #1)
Sheila Connolly
(June 26)

New cozy mystery series! (The name Kat(i)e certainly seems to be popular in fiction these days.)

 

For all the scores of biographies of Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of the most famous detective in the world, there is no recent book that tells this remarkable story–in which Conan Doyle becomes a real-life detective on an actual murder case. In Conan Doyle for the Defense, Margalit Fox takes us step by step inside Conan Doyle’s investigative process and illuminates a murder mystery that is also a morality play for our time–a story of ethnic, religious, and anti-immigrant bias.

Conan Doyle for the Defense: The True Story of a Sensational British Murder, a Quest for Justice, and the World’s Most Famous Detective Writer
Margalit Fox
(June 26)

I read and liked Julian Barnes’ Arthur & George, and I’m really looking forward to a non-fiction account of a different case in which Sir Arthur took on the detective role. If I hadn’t already zipped through The Feather Thief, this probably would’ve been by Read Harder Challenge book for the True Crime Task.

 

In this exciting historical mystery debut set in Victorian England, a wealthy young widow encounters the pleasures—and scandalous pitfalls—of a London social season . . .

A Lady’s Guide to Etiquette and Murder (A Countess of Harleigh Mystery #1)
Dianne Freeman
(June 26)

Victorian-set historical mystery. Debut in a new series. Yes, please.

 

Maggie Hoskie is a Dinétah monster hunter, a supernaturally gifted killer. When a small town needs help finding a missing girl, Maggie is their last—and best—hope. But what Maggie uncovers about the monster is much larger and more terrifying than anything she could imagine.

Trail of Lightning (The Sixth World #1)
Rebecca Roanhorse
(June 26)

Post-climate-apocalypse fiction set in the southwest, featuring a Native woman who clearly is ready to kick butt and take names. Look at that cover. I’ve already placed my library hold.

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Waiting on Wednesday: Shade of the Moon

New WoW

Waiting on Wednesday is a weekly event hosted at Breaking the Spine to spotlight highly anticipated titles.

I don’t participate every week, but I was catching up on my blog feed and saw Susan Beth Pfeffer‘s entry about getting the official ARC back copy for a book I’m really looking forward to reading:

The Shade of the Moon (The Last Survivors, #4)
The Shade of the Moon by Susan Beth Pfeffer

According to her blog the back of the ARCs will say:

It’s been more than two years since Jon Evans and his family left Pennsylvania, hoping to find a safe place to live, yet Jon remains haunted by the deaths of those he loved. His prowess on a soccer field has guaranteed him a home in a well-protected enclave. But Jon is painfully aware that a missed goal, a careless word, even falling in love, can put his life and the lives of his mother, his sister Miranda, and her husband, Alex, in jeopardy. Can Jon risk doing what is right in a world gone so terribly wrong?

Don’t miss the first three books in this riveting series!

The first book in the series, Life As We Knew It came out in 2006, and I really liked it and its companion novel, The Dead and the Gone. I waited for what felt like ages for the sequel, This World We Live In to be released in 2010, checking Pfeffer’s blog for details all the while. I don’t think it was even being called the “Last Survivors” series yet, and all indications were that it would be just the three books.

And then she had to go and write a fourth book. It’s due to hit shelves on September 3, although it looks like those lucky enough to attend the International Reading Association conference in April might get to snag a signed ARC. The rest of us, I’m afraid, will just have to wait for September.

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