Ten Books I’m Looking Forward to in November

Time once again to add to the TBR!

Born to Be Posthumous: The Eccentric Life and Mysterious Genius of Edward Gorey by Mark Dery (Nov 6)

He published over a hundred books and illustrated works by Samuel Beckett, T.S. Eliot, Edward Lear, John Updike, Charles Dickens, Hilaire Belloc, Muriel Spark, Bram Stoker, Gilbert & Sullivan, and others. At the same time, he was a deeply complicated and conflicted individual, a man whose art reflected his obsessions with the disquieting and the darkly hilarious.
Based on newly uncovered correspondence and interviews with personalities as diverse as John Ashbery, Donald Hall, Lemony Snicket, Neil Gaiman, and Anna Sui, BORN TO BE POSTHUMOUS draws back the curtain on the eccentric genius and mysterious life of Edward Gorey.

 

Girls of Paper and Fire by Natasha Ngan (Nov 6)

Over weeks of training in the opulent but stifling palace, Lei and eight other girls learn the skills and charm that befit being a king’s consort. But Lei isn’t content to watch her fate consume her. Instead, she does the unthinkable–she falls in love. Her forbidden romance becomes enmeshed with an explosive plot that threatens the very foundation of Ikhara, and Lei, still the wide-eyed country girl at heart, must decide just how far she’s willing to go for justice and revenge.

 

A Dangerous Duet by Karen Odden (Nov 6)

Nineteen-year-old Nell Hallam lives in a modest corner of Mayfair with her brother Matthew, an inspector at Scotland Yard. An exceptionally talented pianist, she aspires to attend the Royal Academy; but with tuition beyond their means, Nell sets out to earn the money herself—by playing piano in a popular Soho music hall. And the fact that she will have to disguise herself as a man and slip out at night to do it doesn’t deter her.

 

The Prophet Calls by Melanie Sumrow (Nov 6)

On her thirteenth birthday, Gentry receives a new violin from her father and, more than anything, she wants to play at the Santa Fe Music Festival with her brother, Tanner. But then the Prophet calls from prison and announces he has outlawed music in their community and now forbids women to leave.

 

In Peppermint Peril (A Tea and a Read Mystery, #1) by Joy Avon (Nov 13)

Catering to people who each have their own agenda isn’t easy for the Book Tea crew, especially once the valuable engagement ring goes missing and a dead body turns up in the conservatory. Can Callie and her great aunt use their love of clues to dig into the crimes and show their unhappy hostess and squabbling guests the true Christmas spirit?

 

A Scandal in Scarlet by Vicki Delany (Nov 13)

Gemma has no intention of getting involved in the investigation, but when fellow shopkeeper Maureen finds herself the prime suspect she begs Gemma for her help. Ryan knows Gemma’s methods and he isn’t happy when she gets entangled in another mystery. But with so many suspects and so few clues, her deductive prowess will prove invaluable in A Scandal in Scarlet, Vicki Delany’s shrewdly plotted fourth Sherlock Holmes Bookshop mystery.

 

Thanks A Thousand: A Gratitude Journey by A.J. Jacobs (Nov 13)

The idea was deceptively simple: New York Times bestselling author A.J. Jacobs decided to thank every single person involved in producing his morning cup of coffee. The resulting journey takes him across the globe, transforms his life, and reveals secrets about how gratitude can make us all happier, more generous, and more connected.

 

Becoming by Michelle Obama (Nov 13)

In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her—from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world’s most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it—in her own words and on her own terms.

 

Sherlock’s World: Fan Fiction and the Reimagining of BBC’s Sherlock by Ann K. McClellan (Nov 15)

Interweaving fan fiction studies, world-building, and genre studies, Ann McClellan examines the hit series and the fan fiction it inspires. Using Sherlock to trace the changing face of fan fiction studies, McClellan’s book explores how far fans are willing to go to change the Sherlockian canon while still reinforcing its power and status as the source text. What makes Sherlock fanfic Sherlockian? How does it stay within the canon even while engaging in the wildest reimaginings? Sherlock’s World explores the boundaries between canon, genre, character, and reality through the lenses of fan fiction and world-building. This book promises to be a valuable resource for fan studies scholars, those who write fan fiction, and Sherlock fans alike.

 

Barking with the Big Dogs: On Writing and Reading Books for Children by Natalie Babbitt (Nov 20)

In this collection of essays and speeches written over the course of four decades, beloved storyteller Natalie Babbitt explores what it was like to be a “little dog” in the literary world, continually being forced to justify her choice to write books for children–instead of doing something more serious. Babbitt offers incisive commentary on classic children’s books as well as contemporary works, and reveals colorful insights into her own personal creative life. Filled with a voice that rings with truth, wisdom, and humor across the years, the essays gathered in Barking with the Big Dogs exemplify on every page true reverence for children and an endless engagement with the challenge to write the books that shape them

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Down the TBR Hole #17

Down the TBR Hole was originally created over at Lost in a Story.

Most of you probably know this feeling, your Goodreads TBR pile keeps growing and growing and it seems like there is no light at the end of the tunnel. You keep adding, but you add more than you actually read. And then when you’re scrolling through your list, you realize that you have no idea what half the books are about and why you added them. Well that’s going to change!

It works like this:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10, if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?
  • Keep track of where you left off so you can pick up there next week!

Visit my to-read shelf to see how very far I still have to go!

Minders of Make-Believe: Idealists, Entrepreneurs, and the Shaping of American Children's Literature Minders of Make-Believe: Idealists, Entrepreneurs, and the Shaping of American Children’s Literature by Leonard S. Marcus
Published: May 1, 2008
On TBR Since: January 4, 2013

Professional Reading that I have been meaning to read forever.

Stay or Go: Stay

The Wand in the Word: Conversations with Writers of FantasyThe Wand in the Word: Conversations with Writers of Fantasy by Leonard S. Marcus
Published: February 14, 2006
On TBR Since: January 4, 2013

This is part of my TBR Pile Challenge list, so I should probably get cracking on it.

Stay or Go: Stay

Dear Genius: The Letters of Ursula Nordstrom Dear Genius: The Letters of Ursula Nordstrom edited by Leonard S. Marcus
Published: March 31, 2000
On TBR Since: January 4, 2013

I was clearly on a Leonard Marcus kick of some sort.

Stay or Go: Stay

The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It The Willpower Instinct: How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It by Kelly McGonigal
Published: December 29, 2011
On TBR Since: January 4, 2013

I’m pretty sure I’ve read books that cite this book, and that’s why it ended up on my TBR.

Stay or Go: Go

Magical Journey: An Apprenticeship in Contentment Magical Journey: An Apprenticeship in Contentment by Katrina Kenison
Published: January 8, 2013
On TBR Since: January 9, 2013

Not feeling this one anymore.

Stay or Go: Go

Jews and WordsJews and Words by Amos Oz
Published: November 20, 2012
On TBR Since: January 9, 2013

This one does still sound interesting.

Stay or Go: Stay

Mindfulness in Plain English Mindfulness in Plain English by Henepola Gunaratana
Published: January 25, 1992
On TBR Since: January 9, 2013

Kind of a classic on meditation.

Stay or Go: Stay

The Great Work of Your Life: A Guide for the Journey to Your True Calling The Great Work of Your Life: A Guide for the Journey to Your True Calling by Stephen Cope
Published: September 25, 2012
On TBR Since: January 11, 2013

This is another one I suspect might make its way back onto the TBR at some point, but it’s going for now.

Stay or Go: Go

The Parent App: Understanding Families in the Digital Age The Parent App: Understanding Families in the Digital Age by Lynn Schofield Clark
Published: October 9, 2012
On TBR Since: January 31, 2013

This hits topics on both the personal and the professional side.

Stay or Go: Stay

Prairie Silence: A Memoir Prairie Silence: A Memoir by Melanie Hoffert
Published: January 8, 2013
On TBR Since: January 31, 2013

I never got around to this memoir when it was new, and I don’t think I’m going to.

Stay or Go: Go

Four going, and six staying. Chip, chip, chip.

Related Posts:

Down the TBR Hole #16

Down the TBR Hole was originally created over at Lost in a Story.

Most of you probably know this feeling, your Goodreads TBR pile keeps growing and growing and it seems like there is no light at the end of the tunnel. You keep adding, but you add more than you actually read. And then when you’re scrolling through your list, you realize that you have no idea what half the books are about and why you added them. Well that’s going to change!

It works like this:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10, if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?
  • Keep track of where you left off so you can pick up there next week!

Visit my to-read shelf to see how very far I still have to go!

The Violin: A Social History of the World's Most Versatile Instrument The Violin: A Social History of the World’s Most Versatile Instrument by David Schoenbaum
Published: December 10, 2012
On TBR Since: December 26, 2012

Fun fact: I played violin from fourth grade through my first year of college. Every now and again, I still take it out of the closet and give it a go.

Stay or Go: Stay

Generosity: An Enhancement Generosity: An Enhancement by Richard Powers
Published: September 29, 2009
On TBR Since: January 3, 2013

Powers is an automatic add to my TBR. And it seems I went on an adding spree at the beginning of 2013.

Stay or Go: Stay

The Echo Maker The Echo Maker by Richard Powers
Published: November 1, 2006
On TBR Since: January 3, 2013

Same as above.

Stay or Go: Stay

The Time of Our Singing The Time of Our Singing by Richard Powers
Published: Jan 22, 2003
On TBR Since: January 03, 2013

This is part of my TBR Pile Challenge list.

Stay or Go: Stay

Genie Genie by Richard Powers
Published: November 8, 2012
On TBR Since: January 3, 2013

Stay or Go: Stay

The Annotated Sandman, Vol. 2 The Annotated Sandman, Vol. 2 by Neil Gaiman
Published: October 1, 2012
On TBR Since: January 3, 2013

Neil Gaiman is a favorite author, and Sandman is where it all started for me.

Stay or Go: Stay

The Annotated Sandman, Vol. 1 The Annotated Sandman, Vol. 1 by Neil Gaiman
Published: January 27, 2011
On TBR Since: January 3, 2013

Stay or Go: Stay

The Battle Of The Sun The Battle Of The Sun Jeanette Winterson
Published: November 2, 2009
On TBR Since: January 3, 2013

Another favorite author.

Stay or Go: Stay

Weight: The Myth of Atlas and Heracles Weight: The Myth of Atlas and Heracles by Jeanette Winterson
Published: October 5, 2005
On TBR Since: January 3, 2013

This one is also on my TBR Pile Challenge list.

Stay or Go: Stay

The Theory of EverythingThe Theory of Everything by J. J. Johnson
Published: October 1, 2012
On TBR Since: January 3, 2013

I’ve enjoyed the other books of Johnson’s I’ve read, but I’m not drawn to this one.

Stay or Go: Go

Only one book going this week. Some weeks are like that, I guess.

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The Daylight Gate by Jeanette Winterson

The Daylight Gate

The Daylight Gate by Jeanette Winterson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The north of England is untamed. It can be subdued but it cannot be tamed. Lancashire is the wild part of the untamed.

In this novella, published on the 400th anniversary of the 1612 trial of the Pendle Witches, Winterson draws on those events in crafting a work of historical fantasy, a tale of horrifying events, beautifully told.

The historical facts are these: in 1612, a group including Alice Nutter, Elizabeth Device, James Device, Alizon Device, Katherine Hewitt (“Mould-Heeles”), Elizabeth Southerns, and others were arrested under charges of witchcraft. A key witness was Elizabeth Device’s nine-year-old daughter, Jennet.

Winterson takes these facts and creates a new dark and magical story around them. She draws in other historical figures, including local magistrate Roger Nowell, William Shakespeare, John Dee, and court clerk Thomas Potts, whose account of The Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches in the Countie of Lancaster was published in 1613. The 1605 Gunpowder Plot and the fate of the convicted conspirators is also woven in; there is little difference, in some minds, between Witches and Catholics. “Popery witchery, witchery popery,” Thomas Potts says more than once.

The writing is lovely, spare but rich in imagery. It is an atmospheric book, focused on people and emotions, how human beings can love and betray each other. There are truly horrific scenes, especially toward the end, that pass by in such a small section of narrative that it sometimes took my brain a few pages to realize what I had just read and be struck not only by the terrible violence, but by the casual way torture is inflicted on one person by another. It feels so very wrong, but true.

Trigger warnings for rape, torture, and child abuse.

Source: I’ve had this book on my shelf for a while. I think I picked it up at my local used bookshop, where I regularly check to see if they have anything new (to me) by Winterson and a couple of other authors.

Challenges: Counts for the 2018 Mount TBR Challenge, the Official 2018 TBR Pile Challenge, and R.I.P. XIII (Readers Imbibing Peril)

 

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Share-A-Tea: T(ea) is for TARDIS

In honor of the new season of Doctor Who, Adagio.com had a short promotion where you “spun” a virtual wheel, and a sample tin TARDIS-themed fandom blend popped into your cart for free. This is the tea I got.

Name: T(ea) is for TARDIS
Source: Adagio (free sample)

Description from Vendor: A famous time machine and space craft that does wonders, also known as Time and Relative Dimension in Space. This rooibos tea is filled with the sweetness of Earl Grey and warm delicious vanilla and green tea. Touches of rose hips, hibiscus, blueberries and apple pieces add great flavour to this blend. Cheers!

My Preparation: Steeped 3 minutes at 190 degrees Fahrenheit

My Impressions: This tea has a really lovely aroma, thanks to the fruit and floral ingredients. It’s sweet enough for me to enjoy without adding sugar or honey, which is saying something, considering my sweet tooth. All of the flavors blend together really well, making a soothing, sweet drink that I think would be very nice over ice, though I haven’t tried that yet. Since I’m not generally a blueberry fan, this isn’t a blend I would have selected on my own, so I’m grateful to Adagio for sending it my way!

Ingredients: Green tea, rooibos tea, rose hips, hibiscus, apple pieces, natural vanilla flavor, orange peels, blue cornflowers, natural blueberry flavor, natural bergamot flavor, blueberries

Suggested Preparation: Steep at 200F for 4 minutes.

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Down the TBR Hole #15

Down the TBR Hole was originally created over at Lost in a Story.

Most of you probably know this feeling, your Goodreads TBR pile keeps growing and growing and it seems like there is no light at the end of the tunnel. You keep adding, but you add more than you actually read. And then when you’re scrolling through your list, you realize that you have no idea what half the books are about and why you added them. Well that’s going to change!

It works like this:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10, if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?
  • Keep track of where you left off so you can pick up there next week!

Visit my to-read shelf to see how very far I still have to go!

The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail – But Some Don’t by Nate Silver

Published: September 27, 2012
On TBR Since: October 9, 2012

I’m pretty sure I started this at some point, and then had to return it to the library before getting back to it.

Stay or Go: Go

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder by Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Published: November 27, 2012
On TBR Since: October 24, 2012

Just not feeling this one anymore.

Stay or Go: Go

Fear: Essential Wisdom for Getting Through the Storm by Thích Nhất Hạnh

Published: January 1, 2012
On TBR Since: October 24, 2012

I think I may need to read this one as soon as I’m done with the Woodward book.

Stay or Go: Stay

The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies? by Jared Diamond

Published: October 19, 2012
On TBR Since: October 24, 2012

The moment has passed.

Stay or Go: Go

Fairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm: A New English Version by Philip Pullman

Published: September 27, 2012
On TBR Since: October 24, 2012

I’m considering making this part of my Classics Club adventure.

Stay or Go: Stay

Bringing Home the Dharma: Awakening Right Where You Are by Jack Kornfield

Published: December 6, 2011
On TBR Since: October 29, 2012

Oh, man. I tagged this for a task in the 2016 Read Harder Challenge and still didn’t get to it. Time to let it go.

Stay or Go: Go

Reflections: On the Magic of Writing by Diana Wynne Jones

Published: May 3, 2012
On TBR Since: November 7, 2012

I had totally forgotten about this. Now that I’ve been reminded, I still want to read it.

Stay or Go: Stay

The Myths of Happiness by Sonja Lyubomirsky

Published: January 1, 2012
On TBR Since: November 26, 2012

There are other, similar books on my TBR that I’m more interested in.

Stay or Go: Go

The Great Agnostic: Robert Ingersoll and American Freethought by Susan Jacoby

Published: December 3, 2012
On TBR Since: November 26, 2012

This one still sounds interesting, and it may dovetail with some Classics Club reading.

Stay or Go: Stay

Alone on the Ice: The Greatest Survival Story in the History of Exploration by David Roberts

Published: January  21, 2013
On TBR Since: November 30, 2012

I actually listened to the audiobook of this a while ago, though I never recorded it in GoodReads. I’d still like to give it a re-read.

Stay or Go: Stay

The Last Explorer: Hubert Wilkins, Hero of the Great Age of Polar Exploration by Simon Nasht

Published: September 6, 2006
On TBR Since: December 14, 2012

Me and my polar explorers. What can I say?

Stay or Go: Stay

Scott of the Antarctic: A Life of Courage and Tragedy by David Crane

Published: January 1, 2005
On TBR Since: December 14, 2012

Same as above, really.

Stay or Go: Stay

Half and half – 5 going and 5 staying this week.

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The Classics Club

While watching the first episode of Jamestown, my wife made a comparison to Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter.

“I haven’t read it,” I said.

She’s often surprised by what I haven’t read. My reading history has the strangest gaps in it. Many of the books commonly assigned in high school were somehow never assigned in my classes. When I was approaching the end of high school, the school’s College Counselor suggested St. John’s College in Annapolis might suit. The school offers a single program, called the Great Books Curriculum, in which students study Greek, French, and a course of classics of Western thought; at the end, they earn a Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts.

This idea was vetoed after family discussion, as I was expected to major in something more career focused.

The joke was on me, though, since my degree is a Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences (my final major was actually Rhetoric, which sounds fancier than “Creative Writing”), and I still haven’t read The Odyssey. Or Animal Farm. (I read 1984 on my own the summer before I started Library School.) Or, as I’ve mentioned before, any Austen at all.

I’ve read two books on this Bustle list of 14 Classic College Books You’ll Want to Read Again as a Real Adult: Wuthering Heights and Frankenstein, both of which I read on my own sometime after finishing grad school.

I see Camus’ The Stranger on lists of “classics you should read” all the time. I haven’t read it. But I did read The Plague for AP English. I have a vague recollection that I read it over Winter Break in order to be able to discuss it as soon as we came back in January. Festive, eh?

Actually, speaking of vague memories, I think I may have read part of Frankenstein in college, along with “selections from” Homer. I did take a pair of classes to satisfy a Western Civilization requirement, but as with many survey courses, we read bits and pieces of lots and lots and lots of things, never really getting to delve into the nuances of any one.

I’ve toyed with the idea of working through the St. John’s Reading List as a way of filling in those gaps. While I was trying to figure out a couple of unfamiliar names (there are quite a few science essays in there), I stumbled on the Classics Club Blog.

I love this.

From the site, the club basics (short version):

  • – choose 50+ classics
  • – list them at your blog
  • – choose a reading completion goal date up to five years in the future and note that date on your classics list of 50+ titles
  • – e-mail the moderators of this blog with your list link and information and it will be posted on the Members Page!
  • – write about each title on your list as you finish reading it, and link it to your main list
  • – when you’ve written about every single title, let us know!

They also have some mini-challenges and games, like the Classics Club Spin, to shake up any reading ruts.

I have been working on my list, with a start date of January 1st, 2019. And, yes, The Scarlet Letter is on there.

Are there classics you wish you’d read? What’s on your Reading Bucket List?

This post is part of the 2018 Book Blog Discussion Challenge hosted by Nicole @ Feed Your Fiction Addiction and Shannon @ It Starts at Midnight!

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Indigenous Peoples’ Day

Last year, the Los Angeles City Council voted to replace the official City holiday of Columbus Day with Indigenous Peoples’ Day. In honor of the day, here are some books by and about Native American people that I am looking forward to reading. For more suggestions, please see the Best Books page at American Indians in Children’s Literature (AICL). While you’re there, be sure to take a look around – the site was established in 2006 and contains a wealth of information!

#Notyourprincess: Voices of Native American Women edited by Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale

Whether looking back to a troubled past or welcoming a hopeful future, the powerful voices of Indigenous women across North America resound in this book. In the same style as the best-selling Dreaming in Indian, #NotYourPrincess presents an eclectic collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. Stories of abuse, humiliation, and stereotyping are countered by the voices of passionate women making themselves heard and demanding change. Sometimes angry, often reflective, but always strong, the women in this book will give teen readers insight into the lives of women who, for so long, have been virtually invisible.

 

The Birchbark House by Louise Erdrich

Nineteenth-century American pioneer life was introduced to thousands of young readers by Laura Ingalls Wilder’s beloved Little House books. With The Birchbark House, award-winning author Louise Erdrich’s first novel for young readers, this same slice of history is seen through the eyes of the spirited, 7-year-old Ojibwa girl Omakayas, or Little Frog, so named because her first step was a hop. The sole survivor of a smallpox epidemic on Spirit Island, Omakayas, then only a baby girl, was rescued by a fearless woman named Tallow and welcomed into an Ojibwa family on Lake Superior’s Madeline Island, the Island of the Golden-Breasted Woodpecker. We follow Omakayas and her adopted family through a cycle of four seasons in 1847, including the winter, when a historically documented outbreak of smallpox overtook the island.

 

Heart Berries: A Memoir by Terese Marie Mailhot

Heart Berries is a powerful, poetic memoir of a woman’s coming of age on the Seabird Island Indian Reservation in the Pacific Northwest. Having survived a profoundly dysfunctional upbringing only to find herself hospitalized and facing a dual diagnosis of post traumatic stress disorder and bipolar II disorder; Terese Marie Mailhot is given a notebook and begins to write her way out of trauma. The triumphant result is Heart Berries, a memorial for Mailhot’s mother, a social worker and activist who had a thing for prisoners; a story of reconciliation with her father―an abusive drunk and a brilliant artist―who was murdered under mysterious circumstances; and an elegy on how difficult it is to love someone while dragging the long shadows of shame.

 

Trail of Lightning (The Sixth World, #1) by Rebecca Roanhorse

While most of the world has drowned beneath the sudden rising waters of a climate apocalypse, Dinétah (formerly the Navajo reservation) has been reborn. The gods and heroes of legend walk the land, but so do monsters.

Maggie Hoskie is a Dinétah monster hunter, a supernaturally gifted killer. When a small town needs help finding a missing girl, Maggie is their last—and best—hope. But what Maggie uncovers about the monster is much larger and more terrifying than anything she could imagine.

 

Hearts Unbroken by Cynthia Leitich Smith

When Louise Wolfe’s first real boyfriend mocks and disrespects Native people in front of her, she breaks things off and dumps him over e-mail. It’s her senior year, anyway, and she’d rather spend her time with her family and friends and working on the school newspaper. The editors pair her up with Joey Kairouz, the ambitious new photojournalist, and in no time the paper’s staff find themselves with a major story to cover: the school musical director’s inclusive approach to casting The Wizard of Oz has been provoking backlash in their mostly white, middle-class Kansas town. From the newly formed Parents Against Revisionist Theater to anonymous threats, long-held prejudices are being laid bare and hostilities are spreading against teachers, parents, and students — especially the cast members at the center of the controversy, including Lou’s little brother, who’s playing the Tin Man. As tensions mount at school, so does a romance between Lou and Joey — but as she’s learned, “dating while Native” can be difficult. In trying to protect her own heart, will Lou break Joey’s?

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Down the TBR Hole #14

Down the TBR Hole was originally created over at Lost in a Story.

Most of you probably know this feeling, your Goodreads TBR pile keeps growing and growing and it seems like there is no light at the end of the tunnel. You keep adding, but you add more than you actually read. And then when you’re scrolling through your list, you realize that you have no idea what half the books are about and why you added them. Well that’s going to change!

It works like this:

  • Go to your goodreads to-read shelf.
  • Order on ascending date added.
  • Take the first 5 (or 10, if you’re feeling adventurous) books
  • Read the synopses of the books
  • Decide: keep it or should it go?
  • Keep track of where you left off so you can pick up there next week!

Visit my to-read shelf to see how very far I still have to go!

Comic-Con and the Business of Pop Culture: What the World’s Wildest Trade Show Can Tell Us About the Future of Entertainment by Rob Salkowitz

Published: May 17, 2012
On TBR Since: August 22, 2012

This is more of an academic business book than popular non-fiction, which is not what I’m looking for.

Stay or Go: Go

Dreamland: Adventures in the Strange Science of Sleep by David K. Randall

Published: August 6, 2012
On TBR Since: August 23, 2012

There are several books on sleep hanging out on my TBR, so I can let this one go.

Stay or Go: Go

The White Darkness by Geraldine McCaughrean

Published: September 1, 2005
On TBR Since: August 28, 2012

Not to be confused with David Grann’s The White Darkness, which comes out this month. And which is also on my TBR. One word: Antarctica.

Stay or Go: Stay

Crockett Johnson and Ruth Krauss: How an Unlikely Couple Found Love, Dodged the FBI, and Transformed Children’s Literature by Philip Nel

Published: January 1, 2012
On TBR Since: August 28, 2012

This one falls under Professional Reading.

Stay or Go: Stay

Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren’t the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room Is the Room by David Weinberger

Published: January 1, 2012
On TBR Since: August 31, 2012

“Now that the facts aren’t the facts”… and this book is from 2012. Still feels important.

Stay or Go: Stay

The Well at the World’s End: The Epic True Story of One Man’s Search for the Secret to Eternal Youth by A.J. Mackinnon

Published: July 28, 2010
On TBR Since: September 12, 2012

I might come back to this one eventually, but it goes for now.

Stay or Go: Go

The Story of Ain’t: America, Its Language, and the Most Controversial Dictionary Ever Published by David Skinner

Published: October 9, 2012
On TBR Since: September 26, 2012

This book got a mention on the Dictionary War episode of the Annotated podcast. I went to add it to my TBR and discovered it was already there.

Stay or Go: Stay

Nonbeliever Nation: The Rise of Secular Americans by David Niose

Published: July 17, 2012
On TBR Since: September 26, 2012

I think too much time has passed on this particular one.

Stay or Go: Go

The Year of Learning Dangerously: Adventures in Homeschooling by Quinn Cummings

Published: August 7, 2012
On TBR Since: September 26, 2012

Another stunt memoir that I’ve kind of lost interest in since I put it on the list.

Stay or Go: Go

The Impossible Rescue: The True Story of an Amazing Arctic Adventure by Martin W. Sandler

Published: February 14, 2012
On TBR Since: September 27, 2012

Hey, an 1890s Artic expedition sneaked into the list!

Stay or Go: Stay

Half and half – five going and five staying – this week.

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R.I.P. (Readers Imbibing Peril) XIII

You know what I really (don’t) need? Another reading challenge.

But I’m going to do one anyway.

I heard about Readers Imbibing Peril XIII on the latest episode of the For Real podcast. I am, as ever, late to the party, since the challenge started at the beginning of September.

And what is this challenge, you ask? From the site linked above:

The purpose of the R.I.P. Challenge is to enjoy books that could be classified as:
Mystery.
Suspense.
Thriller.
Dark Fantasy.
Gothic.
Horror.
Supernatural.

I think I can make that work. In fact, since I’m so far behind on my personal challenge of reading my entire Doubleday Sherlock Holmes this year, I’m already planning on reading both Hound of the Baskervilles and Valley of Fear this month, so there are two books already. (Yes, I am counting them as two separate “books” even though they’re both in my one massive volume, since I think that’s in the spirit of the challenge.)

I’d also like to read Jeanette Winterson’s The Daylight Gate this month, for my extremely neglected TBR Pile Challenge. Also on that list is Shadows over Baker Street, another seasonally appropriate choice.

That makes four books, which qualifies as “Peril the First”. Because why not aim high?

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